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  • in reply to: Developing a Preparatory Figure Drawing in Sight-Size #2758753
    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    Thank you for your reply Daniel – I appreciate it. This is a very interesting topic. Working from a printed out reference image is convenient, but I would really like to try drawing a live model at some point, to experience these challenges.

    in reply to: Developing a Preparatory Figure Drawing in Sight-Size #2754980
    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    This is a standard practice with the sight size method. The reason they step back is:
    1) to see both the canvas and the model at the same size simultaneously. this 1:1 ratio is also important when squinting to remove details and to look at only the values and colors. its easier to compare when they are the same size. Same goes for proportions and placement

    This is true whether standing at the easel or taking a few steps back, no? What I find curious is the roll of tape, and the instructor glancing at the floor when stepping back. If the instructor did mark a spot on the floor with tape, I would like to hear the reasoning behind it. I would have thought the distance arbitrary.

    2) reduce perspective distortion from both the model and canvas

    Is this covered in any other course on NMA with visual examples? I can understand perspective distortion in the context of photography, but how does this apply to (human) stereoscopic vision?

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by totte.
    in reply to: Developing a Preparatory Figure Drawing in Sight-Size #2694563
    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    I’d assume that he steps back to look at the drawing from a distance to avoid tunnel vision.

    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    Do the stretcher bars need to be coated or sealed with something like polyurethane, in order to not affect the paper due to the moisture?

    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    Hey Romel, unless I’ve misunderstood your question – take a graph paper and jot down symmetrical structures made up by rectangles like in the examples on page 39. Line (and shape) divides spaces.

    As for principles on space division, I refer to the not-very-helpful ending paragraph on page 28. 🙂

    If you happen to know the definition of “Good Spacing” I’d very much appreciate you sharing it. I bought the book years ago but never managed to make much sense of it.

    in reply to: "Like" button or similar #1897726
    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    I second this. I have nothing constructive to add to what is already written in the first post. I just want to cheer on people who submit their work, without adding noise.

    in reply to: 100 Hundred Days of Figure and Anatomy Studies #1897708
    totte
    Participant
    No points.

    What is the difference between “block in” and “rendering” in this context?

    When you need to make dark areas even darker, do you add graphite to the same areas again? Of the same hardness, or can it differ? Do you use an entire range such as 10B to 10H, or only selected grades?

    I found your post requesting feedback on the composition of that bespoke drawing interesting, and it’s a bit sad that there were no replies or discussion. It seems as if you tried to balance the overall dark versus bright of the whole picture, to make it more appealing.

    Would you please consider adding a ruler or something for scale in a photograph of this figure drawing? I’m only a beginner, but I can’t quite understand how you manage to get such level of detail on what looks like grain at the level of Arches cold press watercolour paper.

    I enjoy your posts, and your focus on values. Please continue!

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